As residential architecture styles evolve, many features, both modern and ancient, of the home remain virtually unchanged. Paths to the house, front and back doors, fences and gates, drives, front and backyards, gardens and the desire to surround one’s home with beauty are a few timeless traits. Join us as we explore the exterior spaces of a home and ways to create beauty in sometimes difficult or quotidian places.

As residential architecture styles evolve, many features, both modern and ancient, of the home remain virtually unchanged. Paths to the house, front and back doors, fences and gates, drives, front and backyards, gardens and the desire to surround one’s home with beauty are a few timeless traits. Join us as we explore the exterior spaces of a home and ways to create beauty in sometimes difficult or quotidian places.

Wide Open Spaces

Wide Open Spaces

Pitched against Boulder’s Flatirons, this residence is seated on the edge of open space, entertaining a steady stream of wildlife visitors. Instead of fencing them out, we designed these gardens to support and exist alongside the native fauna. Plants that are deer-resistant, pollinator-friendly support other local biodiversity is a benefit of designing with plants that also look great and survive the Colorado climate.

DSC_9838.jpg
DSC_9984.jpg
DSC_0023.jpg
 Good design is more than just clean lines, a splash of color or a mass of plants. At this lovely Boulder home, its setting, accompanied by the framework of the landscape provide the palette with which beauty paints her daily masterpiece of brilliant sunsets and reflected light.

Good design is more than just clean lines, a splash of color or a mass of plants. At this lovely Boulder home, its setting, accompanied by the framework of the landscape provide the palette with which beauty paints her daily masterpiece of brilliant sunsets and reflected light.

DSC_1692.jpg
DSC_1241.jpg
DSC_1659.jpg
DSC_9881.jpg
DSC_5054.jpg
DSC_5078.jpg
DSC_1663.jpg
DSC_1679.jpg
 These Rudbeckia (Blackeyed Susans) and Agastache rupestris (Sunset Hyssop) make a charming pair for a late summer splash of color. This combination provides vibrancy, contrast and beauty.

These Rudbeckia (Blackeyed Susans) and Agastache rupestris (Sunset Hyssop) make a charming pair for a late summer splash of color. This combination provides vibrancy, contrast and beauty.

DSC_5093.jpg
DSC_5179.jpg
DSC_1248.jpg
Boulder 2017-18

Boulder 2017-18

Grace and beauty mingle in this garden as the curved lines of the Fibonacci sequence pull and accentuate one another throughout this design. The underlying rhythm of this garden is based on a mathematical ratio, giving a sense of unity and order to each part. With a mixture of black granite boulders and gray stone patios, the plantings in this garden fill the bold form with delicate beauty. These special clients had a daring vision for their yard: remove nearly all of their expansive Kentucky Bluegrass lawn and replace it with spaces which would be more useful, beautiful, and enjoyable. Fire, water, patios, a zip-line and ninja-line, all lay in the midst of this beautiful family garden.

DSC_4029.jpg
DSC_8056.jpg
DSC_8016.jpg
DSC_8024.jpg
DSC_8067.jpg
DSC_8018.jpg
DSC_8035.jpg
DSC_8177.jpg
DSC_8147.jpg
DSC_8046.jpg
DSC_8099.jpg
DSC_8062.jpg
DSC_8144.jpg
DSC_8152.jpg
DSC_8150.jpg
DSC_8175.jpg
DSC_7947.jpg
Void and Form

Void and Form

Visions of Japanese zen gardens were in the back of our client’s minds when we met with them about their front yard. While not an everyday request, designing zen-style gardens is not out of the question. With our climate’s extremes of hot, cold and dry finding the right plants can be a challenge. These gardens rely on the contrast between void and form. Pathways flow through the heart of the garden, designed to create vantage points and give the sojourner a window through which to glimpse beauty. A singing brook bubbles from an outcropping of massive river boulders, winding its way beneath a stone bridge, ending in a shallow pool.

DSC_8517.jpg
DSC_0974.jpg
DSC_8374.jpg
DSC_2711.jpg
DSC_8351.jpg
DSC_1080.jpg
DSC_1096.jpg
DSC_0989.jpg
DSC_2544.jpg
DSC_1001.jpg
DSC_1122.jpg
DSC_8483.jpg
DSC_1357.jpg
DSC_2561.jpg
DSC_2655.jpg
DSC_1352.jpg
DSC_1012.jpg
Visions of Beauty

Visions of Beauty

One of the best parts of our work is the process understanding our client’s vision for their space and turning it into reality. These wonderful homeowners wanted the tranquility of falling water in their backyard while maintaining a modern aesthetic that reflected the design and architecture of their home. They wanted patios for entertaining and hosting as well as a welcoming place for their children to play. These stone patios and granite boulder retaining walls bring a timeless and rooted feel to the space while their muted hues lend themselves to an understated elegance.

DSC_7847.jpg
DSC_7949.jpg
DSC_7816.jpg
DSC_7824.jpg
DSC_7904.jpg
DSC_1518.jpg
DSC_7813.jpg
DSC_1570.jpg
DSC_1579.jpg
DSC_1620.jpg
DSC_1645.jpg
DSC_4966.jpg
DSC_9712.jpg
DSC_9725.jpg
DSC_9757.jpg
 After a few failed attempts by other companies to create a pond, this client asked us to create a peaceful oasis in their backyard with the foothills of Boulder as a backdrop. A unique mix of formal stacked strip stone and uncut sandstone boulders were brought into harmony surrounding the pond and a waterfall, reminiscent of a path, was created, allowing the water from irrigation rights to flow into the pond.

After a few failed attempts by other companies to create a pond, this client asked us to create a peaceful oasis in their backyard with the foothills of Boulder as a backdrop. A unique mix of formal stacked strip stone and uncut sandstone boulders were brought into harmony surrounding the pond and a waterfall, reminiscent of a path, was created, allowing the water from irrigation rights to flow into the pond.

DSC_5040.jpg
DSC_4946.jpg
DSC_9692.jpg
DSC_9640.jpg
DSC_9627.jpg
DSC_9765.jpg
Rabbit Mountain, 2015-18

Rabbit Mountain, 2015-18

Astride Rabbit Mountain, this garden presented the opportunity to blend home and outdoor spaces with the wild surroundings of the open and rugged beauty of the Rocky Mountain foothills. We used natural materials local to the site and designed the plants of the garden to echo the landscape of the mountainside. We also wanted to incorporate extravagant colors that would take the scorching sun and reflect its high intensity in both bright and cool hues. We were able to capture a piece of each sunset in the back lighting of the native shrub Fallugia paradoxa Apache Plume. The vibrancy the plants of this landscape reflect the beauty of appropriate plants in an equally appropriate setting.

DSC_0904.jpg
Challenges

Challenges

One of our most thrilling challenges in this project was being asked to work with existing landscapes. Often hard-scapes are in place that must be worked with rather than worked over, and mature trees that offer both developed shade and expansive roots. It is our aim to not only create beauty but also steward that which is already present in the garden that can be saved and tended.

DSC_0888.jpg
DSC_0935.jpg
DSC_0927.jpg
DSC_0901.jpg
DSC_0937.jpg
DSC_0930.jpg
DSC_0907.jpg
DSC_0861.jpg
DSC_0854.jpg
DSC_4499.jpg
DSC_4510.jpg
DSC_4513.jpg
 At this recently designed and installed garden just outside of Boulder, we replaced large amounts of sod with beautiful perennial and deciduous plants. As Colorado’s population continues to grow, the need for yards and spaces like this which conserve water rather than consume it rises. In the heat of the summer, our typical Colorado lawns may need more than to 2.5” of water or more per week. That’s over 1-2 gallons of water for every square foot of sod. Imagine dumping 1-2 milk jugs of water on every square foot of your lawn. Those water bills can add up. While it takes upfront cost and labor, converting your yard into plantings is an investment with large returns. The amount of water used is typically reduced by over half and the enjoyment of watching a garden grow through the seasons is incalculable.

At this recently designed and installed garden just outside of Boulder, we replaced large amounts of sod with beautiful perennial and deciduous plants. As Colorado’s population continues to grow, the need for yards and spaces like this which conserve water rather than consume it rises. In the heat of the summer, our typical Colorado lawns may need more than to 2.5” of water or more per week. That’s over 1-2 gallons of water for every square foot of sod. Imagine dumping 1-2 milk jugs of water on every square foot of your lawn. Those water bills can add up. While it takes upfront cost and labor, converting your yard into plantings is an investment with large returns. The amount of water used is typically reduced by over half and the enjoyment of watching a garden grow through the seasons is incalculable.

DSC_4541.jpg
DSC_4543.jpg
DSC_4551.jpg
DSC_4554.jpg
DSC_4592.jpg
DSC_9006.jpg
 each project is held in tension by the framework of good design. While our specialty is plant-driven design using native, well-adapted plants, we follow the basic design principles of order, unity and rhythm for every project. This approach ensures each space is imbued with the balance of graceful lines and an appealing beauty. On top of this, all of our designs work to help soils conserve water and promote native pollinators in each garden.

each project is held in tension by the framework of good design. While our specialty is plant-driven design using native, well-adapted plants, we follow the basic design principles of order, unity and rhythm for every project. This approach ensures each space is imbued with the balance of graceful lines and an appealing beauty. On top of this, all of our designs work to help soils conserve water and promote native pollinators in each garden.

DSC_9029.jpg