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 The cool mornings and shorter days herald the arrival of fall as the garden sends out its last burst of color before winter brings sleep. Now we see the winter forms of the plants beginning to emerge: dried seed heads, flower stalks, bracts. While we enjoy the last few days of color and growth, we look forward to a season of rest and expectation, and we remember that among all the colors we love, brown is a color, too.

The cool mornings and shorter days herald the arrival of fall as the garden sends out its last burst of color before winter brings sleep. Now we see the winter forms of the plants beginning to emerge: dried seed heads, flower stalks, bracts. While we enjoy the last few days of color and growth, we look forward to a season of rest and expectation, and we remember that among all the colors we love, brown is a color, too.

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 Phlomis Russeliana (Jerusalem Sage) is our plant of the week. This easy to grow perennial is under-utilized and its great attributes (low water needs, adaptability to poor soil, great texture and interesting blooms) should be taken advantage of in more landscapes and gardens. We love its stature and presence in the garden and think its winter form makes it completely worth including it in the garden.

Phlomis Russeliana (Jerusalem Sage) is our plant of the week. This easy to grow perennial is under-utilized and its great attributes (low water needs, adaptability to poor soil, great texture and interesting blooms) should be taken advantage of in more landscapes and gardens. We love its stature and presence in the garden and think its winter form makes it completely worth including it in the garden.

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 These Rudbeckia (Blackeyed Susans) and Agastache rupestris (Sunset Hyssop) make a charming pair for a late summer splash of color. This combination provides vibrancy, contrast and beauty.

These Rudbeckia (Blackeyed Susans) and Agastache rupestris (Sunset Hyssop) make a charming pair for a late summer splash of color. This combination provides vibrancy, contrast and beauty.

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 As residential architecture styles evolve, many features, both modern and ancient, of the home remain virtually unchanged. Paths to the house, front and back doors, fences and gates, drives, front and backyards, gardens and the desire to surround one’s home with beauty are a few timeless traits. Join us as we explore the exterior spaces of a home and ways to create beauty in sometimes difficult or quotidian places.

As residential architecture styles evolve, many features, both modern and ancient, of the home remain virtually unchanged. Paths to the house, front and back doors, fences and gates, drives, front and backyards, gardens and the desire to surround one’s home with beauty are a few timeless traits. Join us as we explore the exterior spaces of a home and ways to create beauty in sometimes difficult or quotidian places.

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 This client’s home has no sod at all, only native grass that blends into the plantings surrounding the home, allowing the beauty of the mountains to seamlessly integrate into the home’s gardens.

This client’s home has no sod at all, only native grass that blends into the plantings surrounding the home, allowing the beauty of the mountains to seamlessly integrate into the home’s gardens.

 Schizachyrium scoparium (Little Bluestem) is our plant of the week. We are particularly fond of ‘Standing Ovation’, a recent cultivar noted for its upright form and brilliant red-orange fall color. This native prairie grass is happily suited to Colorado’s dry climate but is particularly sensitive to wet roots. We have discovered its dislike of wet soils the hard way. We can’t recommend this grass enough and hope it finds a home in your garden.

Schizachyrium scoparium (Little Bluestem) is our plant of the week. We are particularly fond of ‘Standing Ovation’, a recent cultivar noted for its upright form and brilliant red-orange fall color. This native prairie grass is happily suited to Colorado’s dry climate but is particularly sensitive to wet roots. We have discovered its dislike of wet soils the hard way. We can’t recommend this grass enough and hope it finds a home in your garden.

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 Good design is more than just clean lines, a splash of color or a mass of plants. At this lovely Boulder home, its setting, accompanied by the framework of the landscape provide the palette with which beauty paints her daily masterpiece of brilliant sunsets and reflected light.

Good design is more than just clean lines, a splash of color or a mass of plants. At this lovely Boulder home, its setting, accompanied by the framework of the landscape provide the palette with which beauty paints her daily masterpiece of brilliant sunsets and reflected light.

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Basalt

Basalt

These basalt columns formed from flowing magma. Now water flows from the statuesque columns, providing sound and movement.

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 At this recently designed and installed garden just outside of Boulder, we replaced large amounts of sod with beautiful perennial and deciduous plants. As Colorado’s population continues to grow, the need for yards and spaces like this which conserve water rather than consume it rises. In the heat of the summer, our typical Colorado lawns may need more than to 2.5” of water or more per week. That’s over 1-2 gallons of water for every square foot of sod. Imagine dumping 1-2 milk jugs of water on every square foot of your lawn. Those water bills can add up. While it takes upfront cost and labor, converting your yard into plantings is an investment with large returns. The amount of water used is typically reduced by over half and the enjoyment of watching a garden grow through the seasons is incalculable.

At this recently designed and installed garden just outside of Boulder, we replaced large amounts of sod with beautiful perennial and deciduous plants. As Colorado’s population continues to grow, the need for yards and spaces like this which conserve water rather than consume it rises. In the heat of the summer, our typical Colorado lawns may need more than to 2.5” of water or more per week. That’s over 1-2 gallons of water for every square foot of sod. Imagine dumping 1-2 milk jugs of water on every square foot of your lawn. Those water bills can add up. While it takes upfront cost and labor, converting your yard into plantings is an investment with large returns. The amount of water used is typically reduced by over half and the enjoyment of watching a garden grow through the seasons is incalculable.

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 each project is held in tension by the framework of good design. While our specialty is plant-driven design using native, well-adapted plants, we follow the basic design principles of order, unity and rhythm for every project. This approach ensures each space is imbued with the balance of graceful lines and an appealing beauty. On top of this, all of our designs work to help soils conserve water and promote native pollinators in each garden.

each project is held in tension by the framework of good design. While our specialty is plant-driven design using native, well-adapted plants, we follow the basic design principles of order, unity and rhythm for every project. This approach ensures each space is imbued with the balance of graceful lines and an appealing beauty. On top of this, all of our designs work to help soils conserve water and promote native pollinators in each garden.

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 After a few failed attempts by other companies to create a pond, this client asked us to create a peaceful oasis in their backyard with the foothills of Boulder as a backdrop. A unique mix of formal stacked strip stone and uncut sandstone boulders were brought into harmony surrounding the pond and a waterfall, reminiscent of a path, was created, allowing the water from irrigation rights to flow into the pond.

After a few failed attempts by other companies to create a pond, this client asked us to create a peaceful oasis in their backyard with the foothills of Boulder as a backdrop. A unique mix of formal stacked strip stone and uncut sandstone boulders were brought into harmony surrounding the pond and a waterfall, reminiscent of a path, was created, allowing the water from irrigation rights to flow into the pond.