The real beauty of hardscapes in the garden are the timeless forms they bear in presence of infinite change. These twin water features offer stability and stillness as water sheets across their granite slabs and tumbles over the edge.

The real beauty of hardscapes in the garden are the timeless forms they bear in presence of infinite change. These twin water features offer stability and stillness as water sheets across their granite slabs and tumbles over the edge.

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   @theacademyboulder , a former Catholic girls’ school, has proudly stood over Boulder for more than a century. It was a privilege and honor to be part of creating new spaces and gardens to reflect its historic ties to the community of Boulder.

@theacademyboulder, a former Catholic girls’ school, has proudly stood over Boulder for more than a century. It was a privilege and honor to be part of creating new spaces and gardens to reflect its historic ties to the community of Boulder.

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  Although Helicotrichon sempervirens (Blue Oat Grass) is widely seen along the Front Range, it never ceases to please with its soft form and blue blades. Along with the the pennisetums, Blue Oat has a soft, mounding form with oat plumes that float above the plant. Its steel-blue blades bring a durability yet elegance to the garden border and set off yellow and orange perennials that surround it.

Although Helicotrichon sempervirens (Blue Oat Grass) is widely seen along the Front Range, it never ceases to please with its soft form and blue blades. Along with the the pennisetums, Blue Oat has a soft, mounding form with oat plumes that float above the plant. Its steel-blue blades bring a durability yet elegance to the garden border and set off yellow and orange perennials that surround it.

  The paradoxical effect of these immense pieces beckons one to pause and reflect in the glassy-smooth surface and to listen to the singing of the falling water. Designed by PCS Group of Denver, we installed the entire northeast landscape renovation (all hardscapes included) for The Academy at Boulder.

The paradoxical effect of these immense pieces beckons one to pause and reflect in the glassy-smooth surface and to listen to the singing of the falling water. Designed by PCS Group of Denver, we installed the entire northeast landscape renovation (all hardscapes included) for The Academy at Boulder.

  The primeval garden conjures images of verdant flora, fruit trees and trickling water. Such images beckon us deeper, offering not only shelter but harmony and light.

The primeval garden conjures images of verdant flora, fruit trees and trickling water. Such images beckon us deeper, offering not only shelter but harmony and light.

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 As autumn’s color emerges, one of our favorite texture-hue combinations is Muhlenbergia reverchonii ‘Undaunted.’ Known for its pink, cloud-like seedheads, planted en masse this grass does not disappoint. Originally found in the rocky and difficult soils of portions of OK and TX, this North American native does extremely well in our semi-arid climate and heavy clay soils. It is drought and cold hardy. Best of all is the astounding beauty and enchantment this Muhly grass is sure to bring to any garden when used well.

As autumn’s color emerges, one of our favorite texture-hue combinations is Muhlenbergia reverchonii ‘Undaunted.’ Known for its pink, cloud-like seedheads, planted en masse this grass does not disappoint. Originally found in the rocky and difficult soils of portions of OK and TX, this North American native does extremely well in our semi-arid climate and heavy clay soils. It is drought and cold hardy. Best of all is the astounding beauty and enchantment this Muhly grass is sure to bring to any garden when used well.

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 Unlike its ubiquitously used cousin, Karl Foerster, Calamagrostis brachytricha (Korean Feather Reed grass) is under-utilized in the plant pallette of Colorado. This grass still maintains an upright appearance but not quite as rigidly as its cousin. Its strapping blades are bold and its luminescent, almost translucent, seed heads are worth a summer of waiting. There is nothing quite like the evening sun filtering through its panicles. We love it in large drifts as well as a focal point behind perennials. If you are looking for a unique grass to try this fall, this is the one.

Unlike its ubiquitously used cousin, Karl Foerster, Calamagrostis brachytricha (Korean Feather Reed grass) is under-utilized in the plant pallette of Colorado. This grass still maintains an upright appearance but not quite as rigidly as its cousin. Its strapping blades are bold and its luminescent, almost translucent, seed heads are worth a summer of waiting. There is nothing quite like the evening sun filtering through its panicles. We love it in large drifts as well as a focal point behind perennials. If you are looking for a unique grass to try this fall, this is the one.

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 Gardens are a multi-sensory experience; not only are they perceived through the eyes but the other senses should be engaged in a dynamic garden. The plants rustle in the wind, the leaves swish against our legs and the smells of the plants reward us as their leaves are moved. This relative of Agastache rupestris blooms freely in mid-summer, a little ahead of the other Agastaches. It tolerates more water and seems more adaptable to shade than the other members of its family. We love it with Coreopsis ‘Moonbeam’ and find its form and size a welcome addition to our planting designs. - Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ (licorice mint or hyssop)

Gardens are a multi-sensory experience; not only are they perceived through the eyes but the other senses should be engaged in a dynamic garden. The plants rustle in the wind, the leaves swish against our legs and the smells of the plants reward us as their leaves are moved. This relative of Agastache rupestris blooms freely in mid-summer, a little ahead of the other Agastaches. It tolerates more water and seems more adaptable to shade than the other members of its family. We love it with Coreopsis ‘Moonbeam’ and find its form and size a welcome addition to our planting designs. - Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ (licorice mint or hyssop)

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 Panicum virgatum “North Wind” is characterized by its deep green blades, standing 4 to 5 feet tall before the seed heads emerge. Toward the end of summer, its airy panicles shoot up, creating a delicate texture prime for backlighting. As fall arrives, these grasses begin to show off their yellow hues, getting ready for their grand finale.

Panicum virgatum “North Wind” is characterized by its deep green blades, standing 4 to 5 feet tall before the seed heads emerge. Toward the end of summer, its airy panicles shoot up, creating a delicate texture prime for backlighting. As fall arrives, these grasses begin to show off their yellow hues, getting ready for their grand finale.

 While green sod is pretty, colorful combinations of perennials with persisting interest through the winter are beautiful. Not to mention the biodiversity supported by native and well-adapted plants.

While green sod is pretty, colorful combinations of perennials with persisting interest through the winter are beautiful. Not to mention the biodiversity supported by native and well-adapted plants.

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 Boulders often serve as an event on a winding path, a backdrop for perennials and grasses, a focal point and sculptural element in the planting beds. They hold interest through the winter and their solidity brings gravity to the garden beds.

Boulders often serve as an event on a winding path, a backdrop for perennials and grasses, a focal point and sculptural element in the planting beds. They hold interest through the winter and their solidity brings gravity to the garden beds.

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